New study: Children who received vaccines during their childhood are 10 times less likely to develop cancer, study finds

The new study found children who received childhood vaccines during childhood had a higher risk of developing cancer compared to children who did not receive vaccines, and a higher chance of dying from cancer than those who did.

The researchers examined data from more than 7 million children who were enrolled in the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) from 1999 to 2013.

The study focused on cancer in children between the ages of 3 and 19.

The findings were published in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Vaccines for measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) have helped reduce the spread of the disease, but there have been cases of serious complications.

There have been more than 8,000 deaths linked to the disease since the first shots were given in 1996.

Vaccine use has increased, but the virus has also increased.

The new data showed that the odds of developing cancers increased by a whopping 17 percent among children who had received vaccines in childhood compared to those who had not.

Children who were vaccinated were 1.8 times more likely to have a cancer death compared to their peers who did have the disease.

Children also were 2.9 times more often diagnosed with cancer than children who didn’t get the vaccine, and 3.1 times more than those without the vaccine.

“It is clear that children who receive vaccinations during their first years of life are at higher risk for developing cancer,” study co-author Dr. Robert S. Lustig said in a statement.

“This may be due to the increased risk of infection with the virus during this time, which is why it is important to vaccinate as soon as possible, regardless of vaccination status.”

The study did not examine how the vaccine would affect cancer.

Dr. James Fauci, a professor at Harvard Medical School who was not involved in the study, told Business Insider that the results are “not surprising.”

“It’s not surprising, it’s just a little bit surprising that this would be found,” he said.

“The vaccine is a very safe vaccine and you get it in the early years of childhood, but it can cause side effects, so it’s important to be vaccinated.”

The CDC is recommending that people start getting their first shot by the age of 18.

However, the CDC has warned parents to make sure that they are vaccinating their children to protect them from the virus.

The CDC said in its website that there are “no known health benefits to the use of the MMR vaccine in children younger than 12 months of age.”

The researchers also noted that other research suggests that vaccines can also increase the risk of death in children.

“We found that children with the highest odds of having cancer had a greater risk of mortality than children with low odds,” Dr. Lustigs said.

Dr Lustigs, who is also a professor of pediatrics at the University of Chicago, said that the study could help doctors diagnose the disease in the future.

“I would hope that by doing a more thorough study, we can make more progress,” he added.