Why is it taking so long to bring back the Boston Marathon?

The city of Boston is taking another step toward recovering from the marathon bombings, and its chief medical officer is urging people to be patient as she tries to get them back on their feet.

In a conference call Tuesday, Dr. John Fennell said the city would release data from its Marathon and other health data to show how many of its residents are in serious or life-threatening conditions.

Fennell did not specify how many people will need to be in serious condition to get back on the job, or when those will be released.

Boston has about 7,600 beds for the city’s more than 13,000 patients.

That compares with a national average of more than 15,000 beds.

Freenell said there is a “very good chance” that people with serious health issues will get back into the city in the coming weeks.

The calls are being held as Boston begins to recover from the bombings and its coronavirus-related deaths.

The city’s Office of Emergency Management said Monday that it had received nearly 9,000 calls from Boston area residents about possible exposure to the virus, with most of them from residents living outside of the city.

The city is working on a plan to provide clean water, power and other services for people with respiratory illnesses, but the efforts are far from over.

Fennel said Monday the city has “some work to do” on those plans.

Flynn L. Miller, a Boston University medical professor who has been monitoring coronaviruses for about three years, said the situation is not going to get better quickly.

“There is not a lot of urgency about it,” he said.

“I think what is going to happen is we’re going to have to wait for another few weeks or months, maybe even longer.

It’s a slow process.”

The city said Monday it had begun releasing information about coronavirence cases that are expected to have been reported in recent days.